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Small Bowel Enteroscopy

What is a small bowel enteroscopy?

Evaluation of the small bowel is difficult due to its length and location, therefore a longer scope is necessary for effective visualization, therapeutic and interventional therapies. In some cases, balloons are fitted onto the end of the scope and inflated to examine otherwise inaccessible areas of the small bowel.

Why is it recommended?

The procedure is an alternative to a much more invasive open-abdomen procedure in determining the source of gastrointestinal bleeding and/or initial diagnosis of conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

How to prepare:

This procedure requires an empty stomach, so you will be asked to fast for approximately 12 hours before the procedure. You may also need to adjust, or stop altogether, medications containing aspirin, iron and bismuth subsalicylate. In some cases, bowel prep may be necessary.

What to expect:

The enteroscope may be inserted rectally or orally, but either way, you will be sedated. The procedure itself takes one to two hours.

What happens next:

Upon waking in a recovery bay, you won't have any recollection of the procedure and might feel a little 'foggy' from the sedative. It's mandatory that a companion be available to drive you home. Preliminary results may be discussed, and if necessary, a follow-up appointment with any physician on Memorial Hermann's multi-disciplinary team may be scheduled.

feel a little sore, but you should be able to resume your regular diet approximately two hours after the procedure. Preliminary results may be discussed, and if necessary, a follow-up appointment with any physician on Memorial Hermann's multi-disciplinary team may be scheduled.