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Are You a Candidate for Pelvic Floor Treatment?


Pelvic floor disorders are not a normal part of aging. By taking the quiz, you can learn more about your condition and the next steps you can take toward wellness and recovery.

The quiz is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as or replace a physician’s medical advice.

If you need a physician referral, click here. We will be happy to help you find a qualified specialist affiliated with our Pelvic Floor Health Center. Please contact us online or by calling (713) 242-4PFD (4733).

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Pelvic Floor Disorders

Based on your responses to our quiz, you may not be a candidate for pelvic floor treatment at this time. However, there are many things you can do to improve your pelvic health and prevent pelvic floor disorders. To learn more about preventive measures you can take now, click below.

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*The quiz is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as or replace a physician’s medical advice. You should check with your physician for a true medical diagnosis. If you need a physician referral, click here.

Urinary Incontinence

You’re not alone. Urinary incontinence affects both men and women, and there are a variety of reasons this can occur. Different conditions such as diabetes or a nerve disorder, or events such as childbirth or prostate surgery can be a catalyst for urinary incontinence. Different types of incontinence occur for varying reasons, and in some cases the reasons are gender-specific. The most common forms of incontinence are stress; urge/overactive/ spastic bladder; and mixed incontinence.

Urinary Tract Infections, prostatitis, prostadynia , kidney stones, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and bladder cancer are some of the other reasons you might be experiencing urinary symptoms.

Most of these conditions are not life threatening; however, if left untreated, they can dramatically alter one’s lifestyle and potentially lead to additional pelvic floor disorders, and even severe depression.

Bowel Incontinence

You’re not alone. Fecal incontinence is the loss of bowel control. Normal bowel continence requires that the anal sphincter muscles, pelvic floor, stool volume, stool consistency and nerve function work together in a complex manner. Any disease process that disturbs this complex interaction can lead to fecal incontinence. Such problems might include nerve damage, bowel inflammatory conditions, impacted stool, physical damage, cognitive impairment and prolapsing hemorrhoids, just to name a few. The causes specific to women result primarily from pregnancy, and this may be a result of the actual delivery or the pressure placed on the rectum throughout pregnancy.

The most common types of fecal incontinence are: fecal soiling or smearing; urge; passive; and overflow fecal incontinence. Other conditions include multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, colon or rectal cancer, diverticulitis, and hemorrhoids.

Most of these conditions are not life threatening; however, if left untreated, they can dramatically alter one’s lifestyle and potentially lead to additional pelvic floor disorders, and even severe depression.

Pelvic Pain and/or Pressure

You’re not alone. Pelvic pain affects men and women and can occur as a chronic (symptoms develop and worsen over a period of time) or acute (symptoms appear suddenly and rapidly change or worsen) condition. Depending on its source, pelvic pain may be dull or sharp, it may be constant or off and on (intermittent), and its intensity may range from mild to severe. Pelvic pain can sometimes radiate to the lower back, buttocks or thighs. Some patients only experience pain during certain activities or body positions, such as urination, intercourse or bowel movement. The lack of movement, such as sitting or standing for a long time may also cause the symptoms to worsen.

Pelvic pain often arises from the digestive, reproductive or urinary system. Usually, chronic pelvic pain (meaning you’ve had the symptoms for six months or more) occurs when the muscles, ligaments, and nerves in the pelvic area become inflamed or irritated. Pelvic pain in men and women – which may originate in the pelvic bone or in the nonreproductive internal organs, such as the bladder or colon – may be a symptom of infection.

Some of the more common reasons for pelvic pain are: pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, ovarian cyst, ovarian cancer, uterine fibroids, vulvodynia, interscitial cystitus (IC), prostatysis, prostaydinia, diverticulitis, kidney stones, and urinary tract infections (UTI’s).

Most of these conditions are not life threatening; however, if left untreated, they can dramatically alter one’s lifestyle and potentially lead to additional pelvic floor disorders, and even severe depression.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse

You’re not alone. Studies show up to 40 percent of women will have some form of prolapse due to their unique anatomical makeup. Prolapse occurs when pelvic floor muscles weaken, resulting in organs dropping and/or shifting from their normal anatomical position. In many cases patients who have prolapsed won’t have any symptoms, but if the shift results in one organ protruding into another, the patient will likely feel something bulging and/or pain, especially during a bowel movement. Unlike other pelvic floor disorders, studies show prolapse can be hereditary.

The most common forms of prolapse are bladder, uterine, rectal, vaginal, and anal. In many cases patients suffer from one or more types of prolapse.

Most of these conditions are not life threatening; however, if left untreated, they can dramatically alter one’s lifestyle and potentially lead to additional pelvic floor disorders, and even severe depression.

For more information, please contact one of our Nurse Navigators at 713-242-4PFD (4733).

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